Kristine Neil

Marketing

Data is Lying to You

Business, Marketing, StrategyKristine NeilComment

A quick Google search on “key metrics to track for your website” yields a plethora of resources on everything from bounce rate to conversion rates by traffic source and from authors as diverse as the well-respected Hubspot to some random guy online who decided he was an expert on this topic.  

Metrics are important because in many ways having a website is like opening a retail store on Main Street, leaving the front door unlocked and walking away. Without them, you don’t really know who’s coming in, who’s interested in what inventory or who’s getting frustrated and leaving before making a purchase. You’d never leave your shop unstaffed, and website analytics are the online equivalent of watching what customers do to figure out how to give them more of what they want and (hopefully) get them to eventually become your customer. 

I’m definitely in favor of making well-informed decisions backed by data and tracking and analyzing all these metrics can absolutely help you understand some of what’s going on when people visit your site, but the real truth is that the metrics never tell the whole story. The data, unfortunately, is lying to you. 

Not intentionally, of course. But at best, it’s at least not telling you the whole truth. As much as the left-brained people in the room would love for us to be able to chart and graph our way to understanding what motivates people as they explore and discover our content online, there are just some things that are nearly impossible to map. Here are five things to consider when looking at your metrics that might help you understand the rest of the story. 

Understanding Behavioral Economics & Buyer Psychology 

I believe that any good post on metrics or analytics has to start with at least acknowledging that there’s an entire field of study devoted to understanding why people make irrational purchasing decisions that routinely defy economic theory. The long and short of this when it comes to thinking about how users experience your website is that sometimes we, as humans, simply do not act in our own best interests. We’re dumb like that. Your site may logically outline the benefits of your product or service, provide social proof in the way of user reviews and testimonials, ethically appeal to the emotional triggers that motivate a purchase… all the things. And users still may not buy. Well, what does this do to that neat little traffic funnel you’re analyzing? Right - it makes it look like for some reason you have control over why this person has opted out.

The truth is that while traditional economics would have us believe that we all always fairly weigh all options presented to us and make rational purchasing decisions based on facts that this is just not the case. People may be distracted, they might have other personal things going on, they might have had a few too many glasses of wine at happy hour, they may have some deep, psychological block that is preventing them from seeing the value in your work.

I find this especially true for service-based businesses (like Markon and so many of our clients are!). We know we could help people improve their web presence, better showcase their brand, get noticed for how amazing they are and… they just may not be ready for that. They aren’t not purchasing from us because they don’t recognize the value we offer, they’re not purchasing because they don’t feel that they are worth it. Maybe they’re suffering from impostor syndrome. Maybe they lack confidence in their ability to succeed in business. Whatever it is, it’s not your fault, and the metrics aren’t going to fill in these blanks. The nuances of purchasing behavior aren’t something inherently graph-able. You’re not a psychiatrist, and your website isn’t a failure because someone else just isn’t ready yet. 

The Art of Perfect Timing

At a conference in Boston last year, I had the pleasure of listening to Daniel Pink speak. He gave a wonderfully informative presentation about timing, based on the findings he outlines in his book. It was all brilliant, scientific, rational stuff. But, as we said, we don’t all always perform rationally, and a lot of our success in business comes down not only to what but when. I’m not talking about timing when it comes to when to get into a particular business or industry; I’m assuming that as a smart business person that you’ve researched and studied the trends relevant to your field and are getting into the market at a time that makes sense for profitability. I’m talking about timing when it comes to interacting with the right potential clients at the right time for them

Metrics assume that all visitors are at the same place on their journey and that they are all in a position to buy right now. But unless you’re doing some sort of exit polling as people click away from your website (and wouldn’t that be annoying?!) you have no idea why people aren’t doing what you want on your site right when you want them to. Say you offer a service only for businesses that have been open for three years or more, but a visitor saw you on social media, loves your work and is aspiring to be your client one day. If they are just starting out, it may take years for them to convert. They may visit your site periodically because it helps motivate them towards what they are working for. You may see their visits in your analytics panel as another lead lost, but they’re just waiting for when they’ll be qualified enough to work with you. The perfect time

Asking the Right Questions

Metrics are great at providing answers but are you sure you’re asking the right questions? Because so much of looking at analytics is us both trying to make sense of past data without full context and trying to guess at what future user actions might be without being mind readers, there’s a ton about the numbers you look at every month that is 100%, completely and entirely arbitrary. That can be a bit unsettling if you use those numbers to make significant business decisions regarding staffing levels, pay raises, inventory holdings, budgeting, etc. Setting targets is great but what if you pick the wrong target? Your numbers will either look really great or super crappy as a result of your lousy target picking. Maybe you didn’t under- or over-perform; perhaps you did just fine, and you’re just really bad at picking targets. The whole thing is a crapshoot if you look at data within a vacuum and fail to make sure you know what you’re asking the numbers to tell you. Vanity metrics are like vanity sizing; at the end of the day, the only person you’re fooling is yourself.  

Leading with Heart

In business school, we spent some time debating whether leaders are born or whether they can be made. Is there an innate sense of what it takes to be a great leader within some people, and do other people just have to work really hard to train that sense? For me, the answer was always a mix of both. It takes a little bit of intuition and a whole lot of experience to be able to lead a company (even if you’re a company of one!). The trouble is that we tend to give a ton of credit to that which we can measure and objectify and downplay the ability to make decisions just because they feel like the right thing to do. These decisions may seem subjective and may go against everything the numbers tell us to do, but they are still the right decisions.

A great example of this can be seen when looking at online shoe retailer Zappos. The company is well known for going to extreme lengths to take care of customers. From spending hours on the phone,  to sending flowers to grieving clients, to taking back discontinued shoes - the company routinely makes decisions that fly in the face of “good metrics.” But they’re asking the right questions (see what I did there?), and they know that the things that truly matter (i.e., customer loyalty, brand devotion) may not be measurable in a traditional sense. And if you’re still on the fence about whether it’s worth it to pay a call center employee hourly to spend an inordinate amount of time being helpful to your customers, here’s a number that may work for you: $928 million.

Quality vs. Quality

I was chatting with one of our search partners the other day and not to get too Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance on anyone but we ended up having a conversation about what quality really means. It was deep. Unlike traditional search which weighs potential matches and returns a ranked list, what we were looking at with this partner was a matching algorithm that instead was trying to provide the one best match to every searcher. This logic is similar to that used by your voice assistant (Alexa or Siri or whoever); in a world of virtually endless possibilities (quantity), voice assistants seek to return only what they deem to be the best match (quality).

What does this have to do with metrics? A lot, really. As we start to see a more significant number of users shift to search methods that are seeking quality over quantity, some of us may see a dip in related metrics. Without understanding why this may be happening, we may falsely attribute the apparent reduction in traffic or click thru rates to something we’re doing wrong (asking the wrong questions). What we should really be thinking about is whether it matters to us that we have a high volume of irrelevant traffic or if, just like the customer, we’re actually seeking out our one best match. Personally, I don’t care if one thousand people see our site if they aren’t the right people. I would rather have one person check us out and think This! This is exactly what I’m looking for! These are my people!

So what to do about this? 

I’m definitely not saying to abandon the analytics panel. Metrics have a strong role to play in business decision-making and can help guide us towards understanding some of what’s happening on our website or in our social feeds. We just need to be aware that the numbers and targets we’re looking at can only be as good as the context in which we frame them. Spending time trying to understand the motivations and challenges your target demographic may face can help you fill in the blanks when the charts seem mystifying and guide you towards the rest of the story. If you find yourself too bogged down by what look like dismal numbers on the surface, take a step back and think about what else may really be going on. If you’re playing the long game, you’ll care more about the 10,000-foot view than any one day’s worth of data anyways.

https://markonbrands.com/blog/data-is-lying-to-you

26 Genius Product Marketing Strategy and Examples

MarketingKristine Neil

Instagram is a great platform to gain traction when you sell online and are a new brand in the marketplace. Find a few hashtags you can gain traction around and then gear your content to fit the content being shared around those hashtags. Post to both your grid and via stories. Be sure to include those hashtags in your story posts too. By doing so, you’ll become part of a larger story around that hashtag and increase your reach. The link in your bio can drive people back to your store, or you can check out how tools like the SHOPPABLE feature on Planoly can help make selling from Instagram easier.

https://fitsmallbusiness.com/product-marketing-strategy-examples/

How to Make a Media Kit

MarketingKristine NeilComment

Any business can put together a media kit, whether they want it to represent their enterprise as a whole, or cover a specific topic or event. The key [is] to bundle all of the necessary components in a neat, consistent package.

At Markon, we recommend the following:

  • Short descriptor of your company/event with key stats

  • Images optimized for digital use

  • Video 30 seconds or less, this way it fits well into a news clip, article, or social media post.

  • Quotes pulled separately from a press release

  • Press Release single page

  • Contact Information Have all of these items live on a web page on your website. That way they’ll be safely accessible (not attached to an email), while the content also gets to live on your website (so it can be crawled by Google).

You can also combine all of this into a well-designed PDF that individuals can receive upon request. Or you can make it downloadable as a single file from your website, or some other space.

https://fupping.com/natty/2018/07/26/11-tips-on-how-to-make-a-successful-and-profitable-media-kit/

27 Best Photography Marketing Ideas from the Pros

MarketingKristine NeilComment

Go Where The Audience Is

A brilliant, ageless tip for photographers is to have their work featured in media that matters to their audience—be it a website, magazine, Instagram account, etc. Those features are leads that can take potential clients back to the photographer’s website, which better be branded and ready to go when they land! Some photographers make the mistake of treating their website as a visual flip board of images and nothing else. While showing a portfolio of work is vital, so is personality. Whether the photographer wants to work with individuals or brands, both parties are typically looking for a photographer they can feel comfortable with. Making sure your website has personality and a solid sense of brand is key to creating that sense of compatibility that could ultimately lead to a new project.

https://fitsmallbusiness.com/photography-marketing-ideas/

12 Ways Content Marketing Can Help Your Local Business Grow

MarketingKristine NeilComment

Brand Loyalty

Local businesses can use content marketing to draw attention to their store or wares by positioning themselves as a local authority on a topic. They can even go a step further and create digital and brick-and-mortar spaces to host conversations about that topic. For example, a local bee keeper could found a Facebook group about the value of locally raised food. The bee keeper would have simultaneously created a forum around a topic vital to their business, while also creating a direct line of communication to the people most likely to purchase their product, locally raised honey. Such an activity not only allows the local business owner to raise awareness of their brand, but the accessible content and contact to the brand often inspires trust among customers, which in turn, often leads to brand loyalty.

https://fupping.com/benskute/2018/06/27/12-ways-content-marketing-can-help-your-local-business-grow/

35 Experts Share Their Best Email Marketing Tips

MarketingKristine NeilComment

Email marketing isn’t for everyone

We often work with clients that assume email marketing is a requirement because they hear other entrepreneurs talk about building lists and growing a subscriber base. The hard truth of it is that email marketing isn’t for everyone. You need to have something to say (not just something to sell), and you need to be able to send quality, branded content consistently. If this is something that you can commit to and you have a real audience that has opted in to receive information from you, spend time crafting themes well in advance. Plan how your other digital marketing activities such as social media posts, online ads, and blog will serve to reinforce the messages in your email. Preparing in such a way also ensures that readers have someplace to land when they click out of your email and hopefully onto your customer list!

https://creativemindscape.com/35-experts-share-their-best-email-marketing-tips/

Lights, Camera, Call to Action! Getting the Most From Your CTA

MarketingKristine NeilComment

PROBLEM: THE CTA IS POORLY DESIGNED

It may come down to something as simple as design. If your CTA isn’t clearly clickable, for example, your users won’t even understand that they have an opportunity to click through and continue interacting with your company.

Expert Advice: Partner with your design team to make sure your CTA is clearly clickable. Kristine Neil, founder of Markon Brands, says it’s important to make sure your CTA stands out from the rest of your website. “Buttons, of course, are the tried and true answer,” she says. “However, if you feel inspired, and it’s on brand for your company, try a creative way to call out text.”

Being more intentional with color so it grabs your reader’s attention immediately is a simple way to improve design and make your CTA easier to find, according Leyton. “This is more than just choosing two random colors that look ‘good’ together—there are perfect matches for each color on the color wheel, and choosing the right one makes a world of difference.” A design team can help with color choice, but tools like Adobe’s color wheel tool can work in a pinch.

Changing the design elements of your CTA takes the guessing game out of interacting with your brand for the user. Maximizing the likelihood of click-through with a few simple tweaks in the design brings your user one step closer to a purchase.

https://www.oliveandcompany.com/blog/get-the-most-from-your-cta

Social Media Tips For SMBs/SMEs: 50 Experts Share Their Best Advice

MarketingKristine NeilComment

Pick A Platform

“Small to medium businesses have more opportunities to connect with potential customers and share their message than ever before.

“But a bounty of low-barrier features and tools doesn’t mean that every business should produce a livestream show, or fill people’s feeds with spontaneous –or staged– photographs. It’s about choosing the mix of strategies and features that make the most sense for the business –operationally– and the brand’s audience.

“Learn where your audience is: LinkedIn? Instagram? Facebook? Twitter? Snapchat? Determine which features that platform(s) has that your business can leverage with quality and consistency. Commit using only that platform(s), and maximizing quality of content and delivery, rather than spreading your message across multiple platforms.

Do not put your teenage niece or nephew in charge of your social media. Do not schedule months of content and leave it on auto-feed (again: be responsive). Do not use poor photography and ill-made graphics – hire the right creative.”

https://creativemindscape.com/social-media-tips-for-smbs-smes-50-experts-share-their-best-advice/