Kristine Neil

UX

Your Personal Aesthetics Don’t Matter in Web Design

Strategy, UX, Web DesignKristine NeilComment

We may primarily work in web design these days but our roots are in brand design and building cohesive identities for small to medium businesses still lies at the core of what we do. The best part is that a website offers so many ways to expand and really have fun with a brand; underscoring our belief that a brand, like a website, should never be a static thing. It needs to grow and evolve as your business does. The problem that we find most small business owners having when it comes to this concept is wanting to infuse too much of their personal aesthetics into their branding, and therefore their websites. But here’s the thing - your branding isn’t about you. It’s about what you can do for your target demographic, or what your products and services will do for your client and it’s about how to compel them to take action and connect with you.

What does this look like IRL? Let’s take a look!

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Our job as designers is not just to make pretty things but to make functional (pretty) things. We know that design has the power to appeal to the emotions, desires, and psychology of your potential buyer and we select design elements like colors, fonts, and photos with intention because they can all convey very different emotions. If a client tells us that they want to look sophisticated and upscale, we’ll most likely want to stick to things like muted tones, classic serifed fonts & very refined photos in a complementary palette. Pragmatic business owners know to put their personal aesthetics aside and go with what the experts say works, even if their own preferences would be to go with bold, primary colors, crazy script fonts, and bouncing illustrations. Nothing says sophisticated like a carnival!

UX/UI 

We all have preferences when it comes to how we interact with our technology. Some people love hamburger menus (those three little stacked lines indicating a menu is available to pop out on mobile), and some people despise them. The truth is, it doesn’t really matter how you feel about these elements because what we know is that they work. You may not like a button in a specific place or how a form has been positioned on a page, but the way you feel about it (sorry for the tough love here) doesn’t matter. You are not your client. When considering how to position items on a page, designers think about things like where the user's eye will be drawn to first and what motions and actions are most likely to get visitors to convert. 

MESSAGING

Any designer will tell you that they are notoriously their own worst client; even the best graphic designers out there often have a colleague take over working on their personal branding for them. It’s because sometimes we’re just too close to the work to be able to see things objectively. We know that the jargon, insider information and technical knowledge we have is likely to negatively affect our ability to see our own work the way a potential client would. The same is true for pretty much anyone in any industry. It’s like how sometimes having a sympathetic friend to talk to when you’re having a tough day is just what you need; they are able to see your situation separated from the emotions you’re feeling. As web designers, we’re that sympathetic friend. Our job is ultimately to make sure that you feel heard and that all of your best ideas are communicated in the most effective way possible to your target demographic - separated from the emotion of the day-to-day involvement in the business. 

This isn’t to say that your personal aesthetics can’t creatively be weaved into the design solutions we provide. They may be more subtle or gentle than you would have done if left to your own devices but let’s just say that with the additional revenue generated by appealing to your client’s desires instead of your own, you’ll be able to afford to have us design you your very own carnival-themed personal website. 

https://markonbrands.com/blog/personal-aesthetics-dont-matter

They’re Just Not That Into You

UX, DesignKristine NeilComment

AKA Don’t Blame the Button

It was the Sex and the City episode turned Hollywood movie title phrase that caused many of us of a certain age at a certain time to do some real deep introspection: He’s Just Not That Into You. It was a real jaw-dropper to be told so bluntly that no, they aren’t just busy, aren’t just wanting to play hard to get, aren’t waiting a certain number of days to call. They just weren’t that into us. Maybe it was revolutionary at the time (or perhaps I’ve just grown up), but in retrospect, this seems so obvious. If someone likes you, especially if they are attracted to you, they’re going to find a way to connect. They’ll call. They’ll DM you. They’ll track down your next of kin on Facebook and send them a DM. (That last one is actually probably a huge red flag, but you get the point.)

Well, here’s the business owner version of the same concept: They’re Just Not That Into You. As in, the visitors to your website that aren’t converting. The truth is that in business, just like in love, if someone wants to connect with you, they’ll find a way.

If your site features a nice, color-contrasting button in the header navigation, some decent CTA text over the hero image and another link to “connect” in the footer of the site maybe there are other reasons why they aren’t clicking. Is your copy dull? Could your social media branding be more consistent? Are you just not giving them enough motivation to click. the. button? The answer could be in tightening up your branding or working on refining your messaging. It’s probably not in adding more buttons.

Other Ways to Fix Things

DON’T BLAME THE BUTTON

If people aren’t clicking, it’s rarely (if ever) the button’s fault. The button is there on the page, clear as day. The truth is that it could be a giant, blinking, Vegas-style neon sign with arrows pointing at it and they still wouldn’t click it. Because you’ve not given them a compelling reason to do so. Sure, we can A/B test a few landing pages to help us understand things like which color button converts for your site visitors most or play around with placing CTAs strategically in the hottest parts of a page, but these efforts will be in vain if you don’t pull your weight when it comes to content creation.

FOCUS ON CREATING GREAT CONTENT

All of this is to say that we can do a lot with a beautiful page layout, our understanding of buyer psychology and various UX/UI design strategies to help move people towards the action you’d like them to take on your page or site but design isn’t a cure-all. If you focus on creating compelling, authentic copy that lets people know why you do what you do, how you can help them in ways other people in your industry can’t and that helps them understand what it’s like to work with you, they’ll be knocking down your door to become your customer. Even if there’s only one button on your page asking them to get in touch. 

MORE ISN’T MORE 

Again, just like in dating, customers can smell desperation, and there’s nothing that will send visitors running in the other direction than someone begging to be hired. More isn’t more when it comes to CTAs. In addition to looking desperate, it contributes to the visual clutter on the page and can actually make it harder for visitors to see what you’re asking them to do. Make things as simple as possible. The web is a crowded, often ugly, loud place. Distracted visitors don’t have the time or mental energy to sift through your junk drawer. Explain what you do clearly, give it a little heart and point them in the right direction: ideally one, easily identifiable way to get in touch with you. From there, whether they convert or not is entirely in your hands, but at least you’ll know they’re genuinely interested in loving, adorable, unique little you. 💋 

https://markonbrands.com/blog/theyre-just-not-into-you